Reb Beach

     Ed

 

Richard Earl Beach

I first met REB when I worked for  Steinberger Guitars, I had the coolest job in the world. My job was to give away Steinberger Guitars to Rockstar's. I met a lot of my current contacts on that job. I met REB & Kip at "The Chance" in Poughkeepsie New York in approximately 1989. I have been a fan ever since.

REB told me he personally liked Steinbergers.  He told me that he had actually designed his Ibanez guitar to look somewhat like a Steinberger. (Notice the indented center section at the base of the guitar).

This was actually a really awesome guitar for an imported Ibanez. REB designed it extremely well. Maybe he designed it too well, it was pricier than most Ibanez guitars and therefore didn't sell as well. REB indicated to me he wasn't thrilled with the sales numbers.

I had not paid a lot of attention to "Winger" up until I met these guys. I wasn't expecting to be knocked out. The show was an 11 on a scale of 10.  Great Vocals, Great Solos, Great Songs. Great Band. I went to see them four more times before they broke up.

 

Richard Earl "Reb" Beach was raised in the steel-making town of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It became almost immediately apparent that Reb would not end up laboring in the steel refineries, however. He was a musical prodigy; playing piano and later guitar at an early age without any formal training whatsoever.

Influenced by the monster rockers of the 70's, Reb spent his teen years jamming along with recordings of Aerosmith, Sammy Hagar, and Ronnie Montrose. But it was Steve Morse, then with the Dixie Dregs, that had the biggest influence on the young Reb. The complexity and the speed of the Dregs was a challenge compared to the blues-based playing of most musicians of that era. Reb not only loved the Dregs, they were a catalyst that drove his playing into the greatness now so well known to music fans the world over.

After only a couple of semesters at the Berkeley School of Music, Reb realized that formal musical training was not for him. Instead, he started recording some of his own stuff on a four-track recorder; a mix of Jazz and Rock called "Fusion." After winning an Annual Best Guitarist contest with one of his Fusion tapes, Reb took his guitar to New York. Within one year, he went from eating ramen noodles and smoking resin scraped off the bong to being one of the most sought-after session players in the music industry; working with such all-time great talents as Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Roger Daltrey, Chaka Kahn, Howard Jones, & Twisted Sister.

It was while living and working in New York that Reb hooked up with his future band mate--bassist and front man Kip Winger. Reb and Kip formed the band Winger, and the rest is history. The two proved to be great writing partners, producing platinum records that featured no less than six top-forty singles with music that was commercial yet complex.

Reb found himself with literally tens of thousands of fans and admirers. Suddenly, he was on the cover of every major guitar publication. Guitar for the Practicing Musician voted him "Best New Guitarist." Guitar World Magazine voted him "Best New Talent" and asked him to write a column. Beautiful girls begged him for sex.

In short, Reb Beach had arrived.

The now world-famous Reb designed a line of guitars for Ibanez and toured, teaching guitar clinics. He also produced an instructional video entitled, "Cutting Loose" that sold very successfully.

After recording and touring in support of three records with Winger, Reb returned to Pittsburgh to perform on other artist's records and start collecting material for his solo work under the name, The Reb Beach Project.

The Reb Beach Project showcases Reb's unique virtuoso guitar style over a heavy fast blues rhythm section with a sound reminiscent of Pat Travers or Robin Trower. Recording is already underway and Reb is talking to Andy Timmons, Stu Hamm, Alan Holdsworth and Winger/Dregs drummer Rod Morganstein as possible guest players.

Unfortunately for Reb's solo project but fortunately for fans of great live guitar shows, the road called and Reb was invited to play with long-time friend, the legendary Alice Cooper. The two joined forces for three years of successful touring. More recently, Reb was recruited to replace the departed George Lynch as not only lead guitarist but also co-songwriter of Dokken. Not surprisingly, the resulting CD is the most successful Dokken record in almost a decade. Years of Jazz Fusion and session work have not dulled Reb's heavy metal instincts!

When not touring the world with Dokken or recording his solo work, Reb performs locally in Pennsylvania.


This supercool guitar on the left is one of the very rare Ibanez Reb Beach models that was made for sale in Japan only back before the Voyager was released.  Ed Roman is making this body shape available on Scorpion and or Abstract Guitars.

 

 

 

                                       Very Rare All Black Voyager                               REB's Original Real USA Kramer
                     Ebony fret board (unheard of on an Ibanez guitar)        Don't confuse today's Kramer gtrs with anything Reb played
                                            This guitar was awesome.



Call Ed Roman for a great deal on Ibanez Guitars  702-597-0147
If you want something custom built,  Call Ed personally at the custom shop 702-875-4552

 

Ed Roman's American Made Replica of a discontinued classic Ibanez guitar
Available in a bolt on neck like the original or a neck thru body.
Also Available in Headless See Below

 

 
Steinberger Bridge, Neck & Headpiece


 

 

 
Ed Roman & Kip Winger 1989

REB & Ed   -   Ed & Kip 1989


 

Ibanez Reb Beach Model Guitar

Very rare & hard to find, prices are soaring for one in good condition.
 Some of the Donnie Hunt Models sold for over $12,000.00 it appears that the Voyager will actually sell for considerably more.

 


 

LSR REBEL

The LSR Rebel is a headless version of what REB played in the 80's. It is available with a Trans Trem and it can be made from over 40 different types of wood


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